Walther PPK 7.65mm pistol

This item is HIRE ONLY for use by a recognised Film, TV, Commercials or Theatre production company.

 

 

Overview

The Walther PPK is one of the most famous handguns. The PP and the PPK were among the world’s first successful double action semi-automatic pistols that were widely copied and are still made by Walther.

The PP was released in 1929 and the smaller PPK in 1931.  The PPK is a smaller version of the PP (Polizeipistole) with a shorter grip, barrel and reduced magazine capacity.

Also featured was a visible and tactile loaded chamber indicator (as does Walthers P38 model) in the form of a metal rod that protrudes from the top of the rear end of the slide when a round is in the chamber.

The most common variant is the PPK, the Polizeipistole Kriminalmodell (Police Pistol Detective Model), indicating it was more concealable than the original PP and hence better suited to plainclothes work. Sometimes, the name Polizeipistole Kurtz (Short Police Pistol) is used.

Both were popular with European police and civilians for being reliable and concealable. During World War II they were issued to the German military and police, the Schutzstaffel, the Luftwaffe and Nazi Party officials; Adolf Hitler shot and killed himself with his PPK in the Fuhrer Bunker in Berlin.

Moreover, the Walther PPK pistol is famous as fictional secret agent James Bond’s signature gun in many of the films and novels. Ian Flemings choice of the Walther PPK directly influenced its popularity and its notoriety.

Helpful Info

Regarding dates, the PPK has been is use since 1931 and is still very much around today. It has been used widely by police, security services and the military of many European countries.

Foxtrot example shown here is a Walther PPK, chambered in 7.65mm, fitted with brown grips, a small lanyard ring and is in a commercial blued finish.

 Film Set Notes

A very dependable pistol, its fixed barrel makes it work reliably when a moderator is fitted, an addition that can cause problems on other pistols.